Categories of Q&A
Prevention
Risk
Genetics & Breast Cancer
Breast Cancer in Men
Myths
Signs & Symptoms
Breast Cancer Screening
Diagnosis
Treatment
Side Effects
Side Effects on Sex & Intimacy
Integrative & Alternative Medicine
Health for Women
Q&A for Survivors
 The magazine on:

  • Women's health
     
  • Breast health
     
  • Breast cancer
Read for free.
Click here.


Advantages of Genetic Testing  

What are the advantages of genetic testing for breast cancer genes?

Genetic testing for breast cancer genes has the following advantages:

  • Determine whether or not you have an altered gene

  • Make medical and lifestyle choices to reduce your risk

  • Cope with your cancer risk

  • Decide whether or not to take proactive measures, such as taking tamoxifen or having prophylactic surgery

  • Share useful genetic information with your family

  • Contribute to medical research and knowledge about breast cancer



  • Questions Related to Advantages of Genetic Testing
    What is genetic testing for cancer?
    What role do genetics play in breast cancer and ovarian cancer?
    Are some woman genetically predisposed to breast cancer pr ovarian cancer?
    What are BRCA1 and BRCA2?
    How are altered BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes involved in causing cancer?
    Could I inherit a breast cancer abnormality gene from my father?
    Does every woman with an abnormal BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene get breast cancer or ovarian cancer?
    Who should get genetic testing for breast cancer?
    How much does genetic testing for breast cancer cost?
    Where can I get genetically tested for breast cancer and ovarian cancer?
    How is the test for alterations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes performed?
    What can I do if I have altered BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes?
    If my genetic tests do not show that I have the altered genes, BRCA1 or BRCA2, does this mean that I will not get breast cancer?
    Are certain populations or ethnicities more likely to have altered BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes?
    Is genetic testing for breast cancer covered by insurance?
    I have breast cancer. What are the chances that my children could develop other kinds of cancer?
    Because I had breast cancer and was also in the at-risk population, I was advised to have genetic testing. Fortunately, I do not have an altered breast cancer gene. But is it possible that an altered breast cancer gene could skip a generation and show up in my daughter?
    What are the disadvantages of genetic testing for breast cancer genes?
    Why is psychological counseling a component of genetic testing?
    If I test positive for altered BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes, can my insurance carrier drop me?
    Is genetic discrimination prohibited by law?
    Should I share my genetic test results with my husband or partner?
    If I am thinking about getting genetically tested for the breast cancer genes, what questions should I ask?
    Does the child of a person with an abnormal breast cancer gene inherit the abnormal breast cancer gene?

    Page 1 of 1
       | 1 |


     

    is a trademark of HC Search Corporation.